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John Cusack, Jack Black, Todd Luiso, Tim Robbins


John Cusack, Jack Black, Todd Luiso lead a great cast
in a wonderful, offbeat story about onbeat people


"High Fidelity"

Reviewed by Carlos deVillalvilla

(Click on the images to see larger version and credits.)

John Cusack is one of those actors who is quirky, engaging, charming, occasionally irascible but always interesting to watch. In short, a young Jack Nicholson. From time to time, Cusack will produce small-budget films on his own that are generally paid for by his appearances in big-buck extravaganzas such as "Con Air." Like Cusack himself, these less fiscally ambitious movies are nearly always quirky yet endearing and generally include his sister Joan in some capacity (see "Grosse Pointe Blank").

Iben Hjejle, John CusackIn "High Fidelity," he plays Rob Gordon, who owns an eclectic record store in Chicago that actually sells records, and by that I mean vinyl. The store specializes in classic rock and soul and indie rock. Gordon has just broken up with his girlfriend Laura (Iben Hjejle), who left him to take up with a New Age ex-hippie named Ian (Tim Robbins). While Gordon's store employees — the loud, rude and opinionated Barry (Jack Black) and the soft-spoken music nerd Dick (Todd Louiso) — try to keep the store running (such as it does; the store is nearly broke), Gordon is busy trying to figure out why he keeps getting dumped.

A compulsive list-maker, Gordon seeks out the girlfriends responsible for his top five worst breakups in an effort to discover why they chose someone else over him.

Cusack imbues Gordon with complexity. He yearns for stability and contentment, but always sabotages himself with the wrong impulses just when those goals seem attainable. Moody, tempermental, a musical snob and more than a little bit of a jerk, Gordon is nonetheless sympathetic. He admires excellence (particularly in music) and champions the underdog without fail, which is why he sells vinyl, a sort of Don Todd Luiso, Jack BlackQuixote of music retail. He smokes compulsively, talks to the camera like it's a confessional and plunges into all situations without fear. It may sound awful on paper, but Cusack is likable enough to pull it off.

To his advantage, Cusack surrounds himself with a great cast. Black and Louiso are hysterical as his employees. Sister Joan is her usual acerbic self as a mutual friend to the estranged couple. Robbins shows flair as the new boyfriend. Catherine Zeta-Jones is lustrous in an uncredited cameo as Charlie (one of Cusack's top five)John Cusack, Lili Taylor and indie film queen Lili Taylor, as another one of Cusack's list, lends cachet. Bruce Springsteen even cameos as himself, displaying a heretofore unrevealed knack for the craft.

As a rock critic for an independent alternative weekly for six years, I can tell you that this is MY film and these are my people. Director Stephen ("Dangerous Liasons," "The Hi-Lo Country") Frears wisely lets Cusack take center stage, letting the rest of the performers play off him and build their performances off of him. Cusack takes up a ton of screen time - he's in almost every scene - so if he's not your cup of tea, you should probably pass on this one. Still, there are some great laughs herein (particularly the scene in which Cusack and Robbins meet face-to-face in the record store), a lot of insight into why we mess up our relationships, and an awesome soundtrack, much of which was selected for the film by Cusack himself.

"High Fidelity" is not the kind of flick that's gonna do killer box office, but it shouldn't be overlooked among the wave after wave of teen sex comedies, self-indulgent Oscar leftovers, event movies and niche films that populate the multiplexes this time of year. It's a well-written, enjoyable movie that will be on your mind long after you leave the theater.


DVD at Amazon.
VHS at Amazon.

See cast, credit and other details about "High Fidelity" at Internet Movie Data Base.